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Men’s Health Analysis

It is no secret that biological changes occur in men as age increases from the mid 30’s. While women encounter more dynamic biological transitions, men’s progression is typically more gradual and continues with each passing year. The primary driver is a reduction in testosterone which leads to a host of symptoms many men simply choose to ignore or accept as the “normal state of aging”. With a carefully regimented program from your Genetix medical team, your 40’s, 50’s, 60’s and beyond will experience a smoothing out of the aging process giving you increased bone density, a more stable emotional state, improved concentration, less fatigue, improved sleeping patterns, enhanced muscle tone, and a rekindled libido.

Important Markers

Known as the “feel-good hormone,” testosterone is a critical component of men’s health and resulting quality of life.  There is as much misinformation surrounding testosterone replacement therapy as there are scientifically proven studies recommending the treatment. As men age, testosterone levels decrease.  Lower overall and free testosterone levels yield numerous physical, mental and emotional negative effects.  For example, recovery from exercise, loss of muscle tone, increased abdominal fat, changes in mood/temperament, general fatigue and reduced libido are all possible correlations to a decreased testosterone level.

Produced primarily by the adrenal glands, DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone) is the most abundant steroid hormone in the human body. DHEA plays a fundamental role in hormone balance, as well as supporting one’s immune function, energy, mood, and maintenance of muscle and bone mass. Since orally administered DHEA is mostly converted to DHEA-S, coupled with the fact that DHEA-S levels are more stable in the blood than DHEA, measurement of DHEA-S is preferable to DHEA.

PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) is produced exclusively by cells of the prostate gland. PSA is a useful screening test for early signs of abnormalities within the prostate gland, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer development.

Homocysteine is an amino acid that serves as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine levels increase in the body when the metabolism to cysteine of methionine to cysteine is impaired. This may be due to dietary deficiencies in vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and folic acid.  If homocysteine cannot be converted into cysteine, levels increase in the body. High homocysteine levels can directly damage the delicate endothelial cells that line the inside of arteries, resulting in vascular inflammation, arterial plaque rupture, stroke, and blood clot formation.

Free & Total Testosterone

Known as the “feel-good hormone,” testosterone is a critical component of men’s health and resulting quality of life.  There is as much misinformation surrounding testosterone replacement therapy as there are scientifically proven studies recommending the treatment. As men age, testosterone levels decrease.  Lower overall and free testosterone levels yield numerous physical, mental and emotional negative effects.  For example, recovery from exercise, loss of muscle tone, increased abdominal fat, changes in mood/temperament, general fatigue and reduced libido are all possible correlations to a decreased testosterone level.

DHEA-S

Produced primarily by the adrenal glands, DHEA (Dehydroepiandrosterone) is the most abundant steroid hormone in the human body. DHEA plays a fundamental role in hormone balance, as well as supporting one’s immune function, energy, mood, and maintenance of muscle and bone mass. Since orally administered DHEA is mostly converted to DHEA-S, coupled with the fact that DHEA-S levels are more stable in the blood than DHEA, measurement of DHEA-S is preferable to DHEA.

PSA

PSA (Prostate Specific Antigen) is produced exclusively by cells of the prostate gland. PSA is a useful screening test for early signs of abnormalities within the prostate gland, including benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and prostate cancer development.

Homocysteine

Homocysteine is an amino acid that serves as an independent risk factor for cardiovascular disease. Homocysteine levels increase in the body when the metabolism to cysteine of methionine to cysteine is impaired. This may be due to dietary deficiencies in vitamin B6, vitamin B12, and folic acid.  If homocysteine cannot be converted into cysteine, levels increase in the body. High homocysteine levels can directly damage the delicate endothelial cells that line the inside of arteries, resulting in vascular inflammation, arterial plaque rupture, stroke, and blood clot formation.

Men's Profile

The Men’s Health Profile highlights key blood indicators to provide your Genetix medical team with the most precise data to best analyze, assess and chart a proper protocol for renewed and continued health.

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